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Brother of victim: Who will answer for assaults by juveniles?

Updated: December 27, 2012 6:20AM



Brother of crime victim asks: Who will answer for assaults by juveniles?

I understand the law and the problems police face on a daily basis in Elgin, but as of recently I have no faith in justice or courts, or that anyone is truly safe nowadays in Elgin.

On Nov. 21, my brother and his girlfriend were attacked by a 14-year-old juvenile who stood 6 feet 2 inches and weighed 185 pounds. My brother was thrown into a wall and knocked unconscious, and then repeatedly stomped and kicked in the head and ribs. His girlfriend was thrown to the ground when she tried to stop the assault and suffered couple broken ribs and a broken hand, with several fingers broken and dislocated.

The teenager was joined by several adults, and my brother was dragged out into the street where he was repeatedly beaten and kicked over and over again.

Police where called, and the group that assaulted them vanished into the shadows.

Now I know what the law is and understand the rights of juveniles; but when an assault like this happens, does it make it feel safe to go out on the streets at all? If it wasn’t a juvenile who did this assault, would justice be done any sooner? Where are the parents of this teenager, and why would they let something like this happen?

Those are the questions I have been asking myself lately. Justice is truly blind. I fear for my family and my friends, and fear for the decay of society as we know it. How would you feel if members of your family were subjected to the same assault, and no one was there to answer questions? Are we truly safe? And when things do go wrong, who is there to watch over us and help when we scream out loud for help?

My brother and his girlfriend suffered numerous injuries and now cannot work and can’t pay their rent due to the attack on them. There will be no Christmas for them.

Who will answer for this crime?

Kevin (last name withheld)

Beloit, Wis.

D300 teacher contract impasse about money; they need to bite the bullet

When I first read that the upcoming (District 300) teachers strike is all about lower class sizes, my first thought was, “This is gonna cost us.” Now that the final offers have been posted, my suspicions are confirmed. The impasse is about pay raises.

The economy is in shambles, and in Illinois we are exceptionally broke. We are paying among the highest taxes in the country already. Teacher salaries and benefits are funded by local property taxes. The only way for them to increase their pay is to raise our taxes, since there is no magic money fairy dumping extra millions into the pot.

Taxpayers are well-aware of this. Working people in the private sector have been making sacrifices for many years yet somehow manage to get by. We are well-aware that there is only so much money to go around. The teachers union remains oblivious to this annoying piece of reality.

Teachers are generally wonderful people and provide a very important service. So are sanitation workers. Everyone who works provides some contribution to society. What the union fails to understand is that everyone needs to deal within the bounds of reality. Why don’t they come out and admit their demands are about more pay, not smaller class sizes? Why do they use the mantra “for the children” when the bottom line is always “for the raises”? The reason is that it would appear they are just greedy — and they wouldn’t want us thinking that, now would they?

Bite the bullet, teachers. Share the sacrifice like everyone else. You may be special, but isn’t everyone? The economy will recover any day now, when that happens we’ll all be millionaires and can afford to pay you whatever you want. Until that time, please stop trying to extort the taxpayers.

Larry Schultz

Pingree Grove



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