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School seeks to power up in Clorox contest

Sixth-grade students work keyboards during computer lab Friday Fox Meadow Elementary School South Elgin.  Alot computers schools classroom technology

Sixth-grade students work the keyboards during in the computer lab Friday at Fox Meadow Elementary School in South Elgin. Alot of the computers and schools classroom technology is outdated, so the school entered the Clorox Power a Bright Future contest to win grant money to update technology at the school. November 30, 2012 | Michael Smart~Sun-Times Media

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netbook lab for dundee ms

The parent association at Dundee Middle School, 4200 W. Main St., West Dundee, recently donated $13,500 toward the purchase of a mobile netbook computer lab for the school, according to Assistant Principal Andy Reinke. It has raised that money over through the DMS OPEN golf outing it has organized the past two years, first at Bonnie Dundee Golf Course in Carpentersville, then at Randall Oaks Golf Course in West Dundee, Reinke said.

To learn more, or to donate toward Dundee’s fundraising goal to update its technology, visit DMSOpen.com or email dmsopen@hotmail.com. Donations also can be mailed to the DMS-PA at 4200 W. Main St., West Dundee, IL, 60118.

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Updated: January 10, 2013 6:21AM



SOUTH ELGIN — Fox Meadow Elementary School has 800 students in 28 classrooms from kindergarten through grade six — and just three interactive SMART boards, one “old and outdated” and two just purchased by the school’s Parent Teacher Organization.

It has one computer lab with too few desktops to accommodate the school’s larger classes. It also has two laptop carts with 15 laptops on each, although class sizes are so large, it sometimes needs both carts for one classroom.

And it has no wireless Internet capabilities.

That’s according to Donna Roark, assistant principal of Fox Meadow.

And that’s “a sad situation, where some schools have iPads,” according to Dawn Losik, mom of two Fox Meadow students and treasurer of the PTO.

So the school at 1275 Jenna Drive entered Clorox’s Power A Bright Future grant program this fall, making it through the competitive nomination process. Now it just needs to your votes, online or by text message, to win a $50,000 grant to update technology in its building.

The school with the most votes in the nationwide contest by the end of the day Dec. 19 will win the grand prize, according to Power A Bright Future.

But one runner-up in each of three categories also will be awarded $25,000, it said. And a judging panel from Clorox will pick three more schools to take home $25,000 judge’s choice grants.

Since voting started Nov. 12, Roark said, Fox Meadow has gotten as high up as No. 26 out of 1,595 nominees in the contest’s “Explore” category, and it’s up against some much larger urban schools. On Thursday, it had slipped to No. 53.

The contest was brought to the attention of the school by its PTO, which has made raising funds for new technology a priority, according to the assistant principal.

Updated technology will help the school better teach to the common core standards being mandated by the state, she said. That’s because technology is integrated into the standards for all content areas and core subjects, she said.

Plus, Losik said, “This technology is everywhere outside of the classroom.”

“Kids these days know more how to operate an iPad than anybody else, but they’re not utilizing that in the classroom.”

And with outdated technology in the building, Roark said, “if you think about it, what were teaching our kids today is going to be obsolete by the time they have to use it.”

Vote for Fox Meadow to win a grant to expand its technology by texting “1812pbf” to 95248 (message and data rates apply) or visiting PowerABrightFuture.com.



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